One Last Chance

As Springs grows closer, so does the lovely emergence of the greenery that we have missed throughout Winter. Before these leaves emerge, you have the chance to have an unobstructed view of the structural integrity of your trees. An ISA Certified Arborist will be able to spot any flaws that should be addressed, either immediately […]

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Die Back

You may hear this term a lot when discussing the health of your trees. Die back is when you notice the tips of the branches dying, the length of the dead tips is usually pretty consistent throughout the tree, or in large sections. This is caused by the tree not having enough energy to send […]

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Tree of the Week

Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica) Most of us are familiar with the iconic scene of a graceful Weeping Willow next to a still, peaceful pond or a sparkling stream. Although this fast-growing tree prefers wet areas, it is actually very tolerant of a variety of soils and also has some drought tolerance. They are also extremely […]

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What’s In A Name?

We recently had the opportunity to work on two trees, Mabel the Maple (a Silver Maple) and Sir Leaves-a-Lot (an American Elm). Also the first time we’ve worked on trees that have been named. And why not? We attach names to creatures, and even things, that we care about. Giving our trees a name can […]

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Tree of the Week

Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) Once called “one of the handsomest, cleanest, and stateliest trees in North America”. The Northern Red Oak is well known for its brilliant fall color, attractiveness to wildlife, and hardiness in the urban environment. If you have room for this large, fast-growing tree on your property, there’s really no reason […]

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Irritating Ivy

No, this one isn’t about Poison Ivy, but one that is irritating in a different way. English Ivy, a non-native invasive species, was introduced to the United States for ornamental purposes. It will quickly and aggressively engulf any structure around it, such as arches and fence-lines. This along with its attractive leaf coloration made it […]

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Tree of the Week

American Holly (Ilex opaca) This hardy, broad-leaved evergreen brings some color and livelihood to the Winter months. It’s glossy green leaves persist throughout the year. The bright red berries are around in early Winter and are extremely attractive to birds (but somewhat toxic to humans). Squirrels also love to build their hibernation nests in them. […]

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Fertilizing Follies

Fertilizing = good for plants. That’s all there is to know, right? Well, not quite… Don’t fertilize a newly planted tree! When a tree is planted, it needs time to establish its root system in its new home. Most fertilizers contain a high concentration of Nitrogen, which primarily promotes above ground growth. In a newly […]

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Tree of the Week

American Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) This very popular landscape tree has some pretty outstanding features. The most noticeable being its deeply lobed, star-shaped leaves that have vibrant fall coloration. The leaves also produce a sweet aroma when crushed. This tree also produces a neatly compact crown, giving it a distinctive, orderly form in a landscape. Many […]

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Tree of the Week

Eastern Arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis) This specimen can range in size from a large shrub to a medium-sized tree. It’s lush foliage and pyramidal growth pattern usually require very little pruning. They work great singly as accent pieces in a landscape, or grouped together for screening. They are also popular with wildlife, especially birds, because of […]

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