Treehab

We recently had a Southern Magnolia that wasn’t protected during construction at a house and took quite a hit from it. There was mechanical damage done to the trunk and lower limbs, but worst of all is that they spread their excess soil (mostly clay) all around the tree. This created a barrier over the […]

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Tree of the Week

English Yew (Taxus baccata) This small ornamental tree is well known for its dark , glossy green needles and reddish brown, flaky bark. It produces spreading, slightly drooping branches but can also be cut back as a hedge. It should be noted that it produces fruit that is poisonous to humans.

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Don’t be so Shallow!

We often talk about the problems with planting trees too deep. However, one must be careful to also not plant too shallow. If a tree is planted too high above ground, its roots will naturally grow downwards towards their desired soil level. This can result in roots crossing each other, eventually causing girdling and disrupting […]

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Tree of the Week

Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) Large (the largest Eastern Hardwood actually), fast growing, very few pest problems, beautiful flowers and uniquely shaped leaves. What’s there not to love? Well there are a few things to consider before planting a Tulip Poplar on your property. The wood of these trees is notoriously brittle, and because it grows […]

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Trees 101

When you receive a consultation from us, you also gain a few extra perks. Anytime you want us to come out and look at your trees in the future, for any reason, there is no charge. You can also feel free to contact us via email or phone with any tree care related questions you […]

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Tree of the Week

Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) This large, spreading tree is best known for its fast growth rate. It does, however, require a lot of space above and below ground. It produces a large, multi-trunk spreading canopy as well as an extensive root system. It is also well know for its shimmering, silver appearance in the slightest […]

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Irritating Ivy, Part 2

This time around it is about Poison Ivy. I recently had an encounter with this pesky plant and felt compelled to spread the word in hopes that more people don’t have the same misfortune. Rashes caused by Poison Ivy are a result of an allergic reaction to the urushiol oil found on the surface of […]

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Tree of the Week

Japanese Snowbell (Styrax japonica) If you are looking for a small, ornamental/shade tree then look no further. The Japanese Snowbell produces hundreds of small, white drooping flowers. These flowers are known for being delightfully fragrant and attractive to pollinators. Its bark also produces small orange fissures, adding year-round splash of cover to the landscape.  

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Nutty Nuthatches

These interesting little birds can often be seen on the sides of large trees, upside down, pecking away at the bark and working their way downwards. Many people associate them with woodpeckers and fear they are harming the tree. It’s quite the opposite! Nuthatches mainly feed on insects on the outside of the tree, including […]

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Tree of the Week

American Elm (Ulmus americana) This iconic tree is well known for its large, vase-like growth with graceful, somewhat drooping branches. The glossy green leaves turn a beautiful shade of gold in the fall. Unfortunately, the non-native fungus labelled Dutch Elm Disease has decimated the species. Ongoing research is providing species and hybrids that are resistant […]

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